PENILE PHIMOSIS RELEASE BRISBANE

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July 2020

Aleena Aspley Australia.

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Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the skin (foreskin or prepuce) covering the head (glans) of the penis. Phimosis may appear as a tight ring or “rubber band” of foreskin around the tip of the penis, preventing full retraction. Phimosis is divided into two forms: physiologic and pathologic.

What causes phimosis?
Adult phimosis may be caused by repeated episodes of balanitis or balanoposthitis. Such infections are commonly due to poor personal hygiene (failure to regularly clean under the foreskin). Phimosis may be a presenting symptom of early diabetes mellitus.
How do you fix phimosis?
There are three treatment options:
  1. Continue to “wait and see” if the phimosis will go away on its own.
  2. Use a steroid cream to help stretch the foreskin.
  3. Have surgery to partially or completely remove the foreskin (circumcision).
In most men, phimosis is not a serious problem and will not require treatment. However, it is not expected to improve on its own. As noted above, paraphimosis is sometimes a medical emergency, and the penis may become permanently damaged if you do not seek immediate medical attention.
Living with phimosis

It will not go away on its own, but it is not considered a problem unless symptoms occur. Cleaning under the foreskin will help prevent infection and keep the skin loose. If the foreskin becomes stuck and cannot be pulled back over the glans, contact your doctor immediately.

Is pulling back foreskin necessary?
In the first several years your son’s foreskin will separate from the tip of the penis. … But foreskin retraction should never be forced. Until the foreskin fully separates, do not try to pull it back. Forcing the foreskin to retract before it is ready can cause severe pain, bleeding, and tears in the skin.
Can phimosis be left untreated?
Risks. If you have phimosis, you are more likely to get penile cancer. If left untreated, it can lead to increased swelling, and in extreme cases, gangrene, and eventually the loss of your penis.
What phimosis looks like?
In uncircumcised men and boys, a foreskin covers the head of the penis. … When the foreskin can’t be pulled back, this is called phimosis. When a man has phimosis, it may look like there is a tight ring around the tip of his penis. The area may be swollen and red and he might have trouble urinating.
Why can’t I pull my foreskin back at 14?
This is because the underside of the foreskin hasn’t yet separated from the surface of the glans and the opening at the end of the foreskin is too tight. It’s normal. … But even at 10 years, many boys still can’t fully pull back their foreskins because the opening at the end is too tight.
At what age does phimosis go away?
Phimosis is normal for the uncircumcised infant/child and usually resolves around 5-7 years of age, however the child may be older.
What is the fastest way to cure phimosis?
Treatment options
  1. Exercises. As both a treatment and preventive measure, gently pull back and move the foreskin.
  2. Over-the-counter (OTC) medication. OTC corticosteroid creams and ointments such as hydrocortisone can be effective for many skin conditions that cause or worsen phimosis.
  3. Prescription medication.
  4. Surgery.
What if I can’t pull my foreskin back?
If you can’t pull the foreskin back over the widest part of your penis you could have a condition called phimosis. It’s a common complaint for men where the foreskin is excessively long, or if the skin has been torn and healing has led to the foreskin contracting.
Why can’t I pull my foreskin back at 15?
Phimosis is a condition in which the foreskin can’t be retracted (pulled back) from around the tip of the penis. … Phimosis can occur naturally or be the result of scarring. Young boys may not need treatment for phimosis unless it makes urinating difficult or causes other symptoms.
Will tight foreskin go away?
Within the first three or four years of life, the stuck skin (adhesion) usually detaches, and tight foreskin usually gradually loosens, making it increasingly easy to pull back without any pain. Phimosis should only be treated if it doesn’t go away on its own.
What age should you start pulling back foreskin?
Most boys will be able to retract their foreskins by the time they are 5 years old, yet others will not be able to until the teen years. As a boy becomes more aware of his body, he will most likely discover how to retract his own foreskin. But foreskin retraction should never be forced.
Does phimosis go away by itself?
Within the first three or four years of life, the stuck skin (adhesion) usually detaches, and tight foreskin usually gradually loosens, making it increasingly easy to pull back without any pain. Phimosis should only be treated if it doesn’t go away on its own.
What happens if phimosis is not treated?
In most men, phimosis is not a serious problem and will not require treatment. However, it is not expected to improve on its own. As noted above, paraphimosis is sometimes a medical emergency, and the penis may become permanently damaged if you do not seek immediate medical attention.
What happens if foreskin is tight?
When the foreskin is too tight to be pulled back over the head of the penis, this is termed phimosis. … In these instances, there is no need to be concerned about phimosis unless it causes pain, swelling, or difficulty urinating. Paraphimosis. In cases of paraphimosis, the foreskin does not pull forward once retracted.
How long does it take to cure phimosis?
In this conservative (non-surgical) treatment approach, a steroid cream is applied to the tip of the foreskin twice a day over a period of four to eight weeks. The steroid cream makes it easier to stretch the skin. After two weeks, the child or his parents can start trying to gradually stretch the foreskin once a day.
Can a tight foreskin cause erectile dysfunction?
Can a tight foreskin cause erectile dysfunction? Changes in the actual penis structure can make getting an erection difficult. Peyronie’s (a bending in the erect penis), phimosis (a tight foreskin) or a tight frenulum (the elastic piece of skin that joins the foreskin to the shaft of the penis) can all cause ED.
What causes foreskin tightening?
Causes of tight foreskin. Your age may determine the cause of your phimosis. … This means that phimosis is due to an infection, inflammation, or scarring from an underling condition. Pathologic phimosis can be caused by the following conditions.
How can I get hard fast without pills?
Eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes

The nutrients in many fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes help improve blood flow throughout your body — including your penis. And blood flow to the penis is one of the keys to healthy, consistent erections.

Is it normal for foreskin to not pull back erect?
Normal development

Most uncircumcised baby boys have a foreskin that won’t pull back (retract) because it’s still attached to the glans. This is perfectly normal for about the first 2 to 6 years. By around the age of 2, the foreskin should start to separate naturally from the glans.

Foreskins: what to expect

During childhood, many boys can begin to pull back their foreskin as it separates gradually from the glans. But even at 10 years, many boys still can’t fully pull back their foreskins because the opening at the end is too tight. This is still normal.

What is phimosis?

Phimosis is a condition in which the foreskin can’t be retracted (pulled back) from around the tip of the penis. A tight foreskin is common in baby boys who aren’t circumcised, but it usually stops being a problem by the age of 3.

Phimosis can occur naturally or be the result of scarring. Young boys may not need treatment for phimosis unless it makes urinating difficult or causes other symptoms. As these boys grow up, the need for treatment may increase.

Symptoms of phimosis

The main symptom of phimosis is the inability to retract the foreskin by the age of 3. The foreskin usually loosens over time, but this process can take longer in some boys. By around the age of 17, a boy should be able to easily retract his foreskin.

Another common symptom of phimosis is a swelling of the foreskin while urinating.

Causes of this condition

Phimosis can occur naturally. It’s unclear why it occurs in some boys but not others. The condition can also occur if the foreskin is forcibly retracted before it’s ready. This can harm the skin and cause scarring, making it more difficult to retract the foreskin later on.

Inflammation or an infection of the foreskin or the head of the penis (glans) may cause phimosis in boys or men. Balanitis is an inflammation of the glans. It’s sometimes the result of poor hygiene or an infection of the foreskin.

One of the infections that can lead to balanitis is called lichen sclerosus. It’s a skin condition that may be triggered by an abnormal immune response or a hormone imbalance. Symptoms can include white spots or patches on the foreskin. The skin may become itchy and easily torn.

Seeking help

Some cases of phimosis can go untreated, especially among young boys. You can wait to see if the problem resolves on its own as your son gets older if there are no symptoms or complications. If phimosis interferes with healthy erections or urination, or if there are other symptoms, your son should see a doctor.

Recurrent infections of the glans or foreskin should also be evaluated by a doctor. Signs of an infection may include:

  • changes in the color of the glans or foreskin
  • the presence of spots or a rash
  • pain
  • itching
  • swelling
Is this cause for concern?

Usually, the foreskin of an uncircumcised penis can be pulled back from the head (glans) of the penis. But in rare cases, the foreskin may become too tight and be unable to be retracted. This condition is called phimosis.

Most cases of phimosis resolve before adolescence, but it’s possible for the condition to last into adulthood. Although there aren’t any serious health complications related to phimosis, it’s associated with conditions that can cause soreness, swelling, and difficulty urinating.

Keep reading to learn more about the conditions tied to phimosis, how phimosis is treated, and more.

Causes of tight foreskin

Your age may determine the cause of your phimosis. Children and adults may experience phimosis for different reasons.

In young boys, a tight foreskin is considered congenital, which means it’s something they have at birth. When this happens, it’s categorized as physiologic phimosis. The foreskin usually becomes more pliable over the next few years, with phimosis completely resolving by age 7.

If a boy is circumcised, then phimosis isn’t possible.

The other category is pathologic phimosis. This means that phimosis is due to an infection, inflammation, or scarring from an underling condition. Pathologic phimosis can be caused by the following conditions.

Balanitis

Balanitis is a type of skin irritation that develops on the head of the penis. It’s especially common in males who haven’t been circumcised.

Symptoms include redness, itching, and swelling, which can cause foreskin tightness. Balanitis can also cause pain when urinating.

Practicing good hygiene is usually enough to treat and prevent balanitis. Cleaning the penis with lukewarm water and soap every day, and gently drying it after bathing and urinating, should help. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a topical cream or antibiotic.

Balanoposthitis

This occurs when the glans and the foreskin are inflamed. This inflammation of both foreskin and glans make the foreskin tighter. Although a yeast infection known as candidiasis is often to blame, bacterial or other types of infections can also cause balanoposthitis. Topical creams containing antibiotics or antifungals are often helpful for treating the infection.

STI’s

Certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can cause balanitis. Symptoms of balanitis, such as swelling and inflammation, can then lead to a tight foreskin.

Genital herpes: Balanitis is a common symptom of genital herpes. Other herpes symptoms include pain and small fluid-fill sacs like blisters on the penis and sometimes on the scrotum.

Gonorrhea: This STI may also cause balanitis symptoms, such as swelling and redness. Other gonorrhea symptoms include:

  • pain in testicles
  • discharge from the penis
  • more frequent urination

Syphilis: This STI can cause penis redness and swelling as well. Other syphilis symptoms include:

  • mucus patches on the penis
  • a rash elsewhere on the body
  • muscle aches
  • fever
  • overall unwell feeling

Other skin conditions

Though less common, other skin conditions can also lead to phimosis or cause the condition to worsen. These include:

Lichen planus: This itchy, noncontagious skin disorder can cause shiny, flat bumps to appear on the penis. Topical steroid creams are usually effective at making the rash disappear.

Lichen sclerosus: This can cause white patches to develop on the foreskin and sometimes the glans. Lichen sclerosus can also cause scarring of the foreskin. Corticosteroid ointments may help. In some cases, circumcision may be necessary.

Eczema: This common, long-term skin condition causes dry patches to form on the skin. Certain types of soaps, the way you dry yourself, and other triggers can cause flare-ups. Work with your doctor to learn how to avoid or limit triggers. The doctor may also prescribe corticosteroid ointments and other medications to help manage your symptoms.

Psoriasis: This chronic skin condition can cause crusty, dry patches of skin to form as a result of abnormal skin cell production. Your doctor can help you identify any possible triggers and prescribe corticosteroids to help relieve your symptoms.

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Treatment options

The way phimosis is treated depends on its cause and severity. In some cases, no treatment is necessary. But if a tight foreskin causes symptoms, you should consult your doctor about your treatment options.

Exercises

As both a treatment and preventive measure, gently pull back and move the foreskin. This should be done when cleaning the penis, starting at a very young age.

Be careful not to pull back foreskin that’s still adhered to the glans. If you’re unsure of whether the foreskin is still attached or whether it’s safe to pull back, consult your doctor. Never forcefully retract the foreskin.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medication

OTC corticosteroid creams and ointments such as hydrocortisone can be effective for many skin conditions that cause or worsen phimosis. Even if there are no other conditions present, your doctor may recommend using topical steroids on your foreskin.

Massaging the ointment into the foreskin and manually retracting the skin twice per day may help make the foreskin more supple. Pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil) may also be helpful, depending on your symptoms.

Purchase hydrocortisone cream online.

Prescription medication

Some topical steroids, such as betamethasone (Celestone) and triamcinolone (Aristopan), require a prescription.

A prescription for antibiotics such as erythromycin (Ilotycin) or antifungal medications such as miconazole (Lotrimin AF) may also be necessary to treat infections affecting your penis and foreskin.

Be sure to take the medications as prescribed and for the length of time recommended by your doctor. Stopping antibiotics too soon may allow a bacterial infection to continue and sometimes develop resistance to antibiotics.

Surgery

A surgical option may be necessary if other treatments aren’t effective. Your options typically include:

Circumcision: This is the surgical removal of all or part of the foreskin. Although circumcision is typically done during infancy, it can be done at any age. It’s usually recommended for cases of severe phimosis or chronic foreskin infection.

Preputioplasty: This procedure involves the cutting and stretching of the foreskin. It’s a less-comprehensive surgery than circumcision. It’s an option for men who still want the appearance of an uncircumcised penis.

Frenuloplasty: Similar to preputioplasty, a frenuloplasty involves the surgical cutting of the foreskin on the underside of the penis. This loosens the foreskin enough to make it easily retractable.

As with any surgery, these procedures carry a slight risk of bleeding and infection.

Outlook

A tight foreskin can cause discomfort during intercourse, difficulty with urination, and a greater risk of infections. But with successful treatment, those symptoms may disappear completely.

Talk to your doctor about your options. In some cases, topical medications may be all you need. If your doctor recommends surgery, they’ll explain the process and help you understand your next steps.

How to prevent potential complications

Gently pulling back the foreskin and cleaning your penis from the time you’re young may help prevent phimosis later on. If you can’t do it because the foreskin is too tight or because there are adhesions between the foreskin and glans, get your doctor’s advice on proper care.

If you ever develop an infection that affects the penis or foreskin, treat it early and thoroughly. Proper treatment can reduce your risk for scarring, which may help prevent phimosis from developing.

  • Causes of tight foreskin

    Your age may determine the cause of your phimosis. Children and adults may experience phimosis for different reasons.

    In young boys, a tight foreskin is considered congenital, which means it’s something they have at birth. When this happens, it’s categorized as physiologic phimosis. The foreskin usually becomes more pliable over the next few years, with phimosis completely resolving by age 7.

    If a boy is circumcised, then phimosis isn’t possible.

    The other category is pathologic phimosis. This means that phimosis is due to an infection, inflammation, or scarring from an underling condition. Pathologic phimosis can be caused by the following conditions.

    Balanitis

    Balanitis is a type of skin irritation that develops on the head of the penis. It’s especially common in males who haven’t been circumcised.

    Symptoms include redness, itching, and swelling, which can cause foreskin tightness. Balanitis can also cause pain when urinating.

    Practicing good hygiene is usually enough to treat and prevent balanitis. Cleaning the penis with lukewarm water and soap every day, and gently drying it after bathing and urinating, should help. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a topical cream or antibiotic.

    Balanoposthitis

    This occurs when the glans and the foreskin are inflamed. This inflammation of both foreskin and glans make the foreskin tighter. Although a yeast infection known as candidiasis is often to blame, bacterial or other types of infections can also cause balanoposthitis. Topical creams containing antibiotics or antifungals are often helpful for treating the infection.

    STIs

    Certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can cause balanitis. Symptoms of balanitis, such as swelling and inflammation, can then lead to a tight foreskin.

    Genital herpes: Balanitis is a common symptom of genital herpes. Other herpes symptoms include pain and small fluid-fill sacs like blisters on the penis and sometimes on the scrotum.

    Gonorrhea: This STI may also cause balanitis symptoms, such as swelling and redness. Other gonorrhea symptoms include:

    • pain in testicles
    • discharge from the penis
    • more frequent urination

    Syphilis: This STI can cause penis redness and swelling as well. Other syphilis symptoms include:

    • mucus patches on the penis
    • a rash elsewhere on the body
    • muscle aches
    • fever
    • overall unwell feeling

    Other skin conditions

    Though less common, other skin conditions can also lead to phimosis or cause the condition to worsen. These include:

    Lichen planus: This itchy, noncontagious skin disorder can cause shiny, flat bumps to appear on the penis. Topical steroid creams are usually effective at making the rash disappear.

    Lichen sclerosus: This can cause white patches to develop on the foreskin and sometimes the glans. Lichen sclerosus can also cause scarring of the foreskin. Corticosteroid ointments may help. In some cases, circumcision may be necessary.

    Eczema: This common, long-term skin condition causes dry patches to form on the skin. Certain types of soaps, the way you dry yourself, and other triggers can cause flare-ups. Work with your doctor to learn how to avoid or limit triggers. The doctor may also prescribe corticosteroid ointments and other medications to help manage your symptoms.

    Psoriasis: This chronic skin condition can cause crusty, dry patches of skin to form as a result of abnormal skin cell production. Your doctor can help you identify any possible triggers and prescribe corticosteroids to help relieve your symptoms.

Medically reviewed by Justin Choi, MD — Written by James Roland — Updated on March 7, 2019